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The Future Of Virtual Events


There’s no time like the present … to think about the future.  I previously wrote about predictions for the virtual event industry in 2010 – those predictions were based around a short-term outlook and have a reasonable chance of coming true.  Now, I’d like to weigh in on 2011 (and beyond) and discuss where the industry (and the technology behind it) may be heading.

Virtual Event technology moves “closer” to the end user

To spur increased adoption, the virtual event experience will move closer to the end user.  To move closer, the browser-based experience of today will be complemented by numerous apps that live outside of the browser.  A relevant analogy is Twitter, which could not have achieved its place in the world on twitter.com alone – its power is broadened with desktop clients such as TweetDeck and Seesmic.  Possibilities include:

  1. Browser toolbars that encapsulate a subset of virtual event functionality (OK, we’re still within a browser here – so consider this an initial step only).
  2. Desktop applications – initially, these apps may provide a real-time dashboard for attendees, exhibitor or show hosts.  You’ll get to keep tabs on activity within a virtual event without having to be logged into the event (from your browser).  Subsequently, the apps will become more sophisticated and take on more of the virtual event platform’s features.
  3. Asynchronous alerting services – attendees, exhibitors and show hosts will be able to configure alerts that inform them of important activities.  The alerts will have numerous transport mechanisms – email, SMS text message or social media notification (e.g. a direct message on Twitter).

Virtual Events Go Mobile

Related to “getting closer” to the end user, mobile is the “elephant in the room” for virtual events.  The mobile apps will start off quite simple – think again of the dashboard app, which provides a real-time view of what’s going on within the event.

Building onto the dashboard will be basic interactivity (e.g. text chat) – allowing attendees and exhibitors the ability to chat with others.  An exhibitor, for instance, can now staff her booth “on the go” from her iPhone.

As we look to 2011 and beyond, I see a clear shift in the computing landscape, whereby more and more “computing” moves from the desktop and laptop and on to mobile devices.  In this decade, the smartphone becomes the PC of the past decade.

The challenge for virtual event platform providers is to determine where to place their bets (investments) across iPhone, Android, BlackBerry, Symbian, Windows Mobile and Palm.

Tighter Integration Inside The Firewall

Virtual events see major adoption from multinational corporations, who leverage the events for internal-facing communication and collaboration (e.g. sales kick-off meetings, human resources programs, learning programs, executive briefings, team/departmental meetings, etc.).  Corporations will begin to request the following:

  1. Integration with other enterprise applications (which often sit inside the firewall)
  2. Tighter security measures

This drive from corporations will cause virtual event technology to morph a bit, shifting from a 100% software as a service (SaaS) model to a hybrid model that combines SaaS with on-premise software.

At first, integration points to a company’s enterprise apps may reside “on premise” on corporate servers – subsequently, corporations may require the underlying virtual event platform be hosted inside the firewall – a model that mirrors Linden Lab and their Second Life Enterprise.

Augmented Virtuality

Virtual events and in-person events meet augmented reality – resulting in “augmented virtuality”.  I previously wrote that 2010 is The Year of The Hybrid Event.  There will come a day when every in-person event has a virtual component.  With existing smartphone technology and the emergence of augmented reality – we’ll soon hit a sweet spot whereby in-person event attendees will wield enormous power in the palm of their hands.

Physical event attendees will begin to experience an event through the lens of their smartphone – holding up the smartphone at any location and seeing overlays of relevant information.

Augmented virtuality will blend augmented reality with the virtual event platform – elements of the virtual event appear as overlays on the smartphone (e.g. the virtual booth is layered on top of the smartphone’s view of the physical booth – and virtual staffers are displayed as being available [via the smarthphone] if the in-person staffers are busy).

Bye Bye, “Virtual Events”

Based on the trends I’ve outlined, by 2011 (if not sooner), we’ll no longer refer to “virtual events”.  Instead, they’ll have “grown up” and migrated into a broader category of business or collaboration application.  Virtual event technology becomes a toolset in a larger ecosystem – or, they’re integrated into a broader suite of tools (rather than being a standalone solution).

Conclusions

In a few years, these will no longer be your mother’s virtual events!  The industry and technology will change, morph and adapt to suit the needs of the market.  Let’s all be thankful that we’re along for the ride.

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7 Responses to The Future Of Virtual Events

  1. JC says:

    Hi Dennis,

    Great post.

    Interesting to point that “mobile is the elephant in the room for virtual events.” In fact, mobile seems to be the elephant for ALL events at the moment.

    Meeting planners, organizers, producers are rushing to add mobile solutions and services to their events, which they should be. However, some of the shotgun approaches to adding mobile to events are done targeting specific OS-based applications, which alienates all attendees who don’t own that particular phone/device.

    Some event apps might currently be able to offer a deeper functionality and usefulness to individual users who can access them, including some social media tie-ins, but at the cost of neglecting to offer a mobile solution to 50% or more of the attendees (with smartphones or not).

    A combination of the mobile web with SMS text messaging is the now and future of mobile event services. HTML5 will enable more functionality on the mobile web for all phone OS’s and SMS will provide a gateway for delivery and greater on/off-site support to further engage attendees while marketing vendors, products, etc.

    Both of the above mobile elements have as much relevancy in the future of “virtual conferences” as there should always be mobile options available that service the greatest audience.

    Jamieson
    jamieson[[at]]mosioproject.com

  2. Dennis Shiao says:

    Thanks, Jamieson. I agree with you that targeting specific mobile O/S’s is not the best way to go, but I think there’s an economic reality that prevents solutions from supporting all the major platforms.

    I do think 2010 will be a monumental year for the incorporation of mobile technologies into face-to-face meetings and events.

  3. […] of applications supported by today’s platforms.  In fact, I wrote previously in a “virtual events futures column” that the term “virtual events” would disappear by […]

  4. […] A posting on the Future of Virtual Events […]

  5. I’m looking for a versatile platform for which I can videocast in real time — and also has the interactive webcast tools. I have yet to find a solution that offers functionality for both. Any suggestions?

    I run a small virtual consulting and training firm. I’m looking for something cloud-based that is tech neutral. I’m pretty tech savvy, but my colleagues are not, so it must be easy to access and use.

    Many thanks, and I look forward to hearing your feedback.

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